The Physician’s Recommendation: Nimble Frogs

Season’s beatings! Johnny here, delivering to you my fourth and final piece for the job application that is ARG’s Deck Doctor Contest. It’s been quite a journey. We’ve had eighty articles publish in under two months. Eighty! What a record!

We saw 60+ article submissions in round one alone. Among the many writers who tried out for the position were some names I recognized as good players. However, playing well is not the same thing as theorizing well, nor is it the same thing as being able to articulate sound theory in the form of writing. There was one name I saw in round one that really piqued my interest, and that was Tyler Nolan, whom I know to be an outstanding deck builder. Since round one, I knew I wouldn’t be content with the outcome of this contest unless I either won the entire competition or was runner up only to Tyler. I would venture to guess that he feels similarly.

To Tyler: Glad to be with you in the finals. I saw you in passing at Providence, though I’ll be sure to formally introduce myself at our next event.

Get to know a Deck Doctor – Perseverance through Failure

(Note: Skip to the next bolded header if you wish to access the deck discussion immediately)

Depending on the outcome of this contest, there is a chance that this is the last time I write for ARG. With that in mind, I’m going to engage my readers on a personal level once again and talk about pushing forward in life.

I’d like to think that I’m a solid player. I attend a fairly competitive Saturday local (50+ entrants) that rewards $100 per person for a top 4 split. Most weekends I claim that prize. However, no one is immune to certain moments of good ol’ fashioned stupid, myself included.

One Friday night, at a smaller tournament, I fell prey to stupidity. I played a Dino Rabbit mirror that I had no business losing. It was against an opponent I had a virtually flawless win streak against. For some reason, my mind wandered, and before I knew it, I activated Book of Moon on my Sabersaurus for no reason…to his empty field. Yes, it was that bad. That was like a one in a thousand occurrence though, not the kind of mistake I really needed to study or reflect on. It was a weird instance of spacing out, and it was so unique that I didn’t care as it would not likely ever happen again.

The real mistake, however, was what I allowed to take place the next round. I played against another deck that I have never lost to in tournament (Bubble Beat) and likely never will, and for some reason I just didn’t activate Torrential Tribute when it would have secured my victory. This wasn’t a matter of misplaying, such as activating Torrential incorrectly, or not setting it, or something. Rather, I was even more zoned out because of the Book of Moon play from the previous game, and so I just flat out didn’t play Yugioh that round. I just had to flip a face down card face up to win, and I didn’t. My mind wasn’t on the game anymore. I went on tilt, the phenomenon where one bad moment messes up your psyche, and your performance gets progressively worse and worse as time passes.

The mistake was so bad and so beyond a misplay that I wasn’t even angry. It wasn’t like I read incorrectly or misjudged my opponent’s hand or got sacked. I just forgot I was playing Yugioh and didn’t pay attention. I thought it was funny, actually, considering that not tilting is one of my strong points in the game. The next day I attended the more competitive local in my city and won $100 with the same deck, affirming to myself that the night before was just some weird trance-like experience I would not relive again.

All human beings are fallible.

Sometimes our mistakes have small consequences, like the $30 prize I missed out on that Friday had I not zoned out while playing Yugioh. Sometimes we make decisions with huge consequences, ones that hurt us for years to come, like entering that relationship that you know just won’t work out. There are many principles in Yugioh that translate into real life, and I believe the most important is to avoid tilting – to avoid letting a previous failure affect your future performance.

In the same way that you wouldn’t want to lose to an inferior player round 6 just because you’re still shaken up about the Dark Hole your opponent topped on you in round 5, you don’t want to be immobilized from pursuing your dreams in life because of a past failure. Not going on tilt is a skill most players lack in Yugioh, truth be told. It is just as rarely applied in real life. I believe in perseverance and ambition. That is, to decide what you want, and pursue that goal wholeheartedly even at the risk of failure or rejection (provided that it’s safe, legal, and good for you).

I spent my first year of college in a place where I didn’t want to be. The reason was because I allowed my laziness to get in the way of getting into the college I wanted to attend, and I ended up at my safety school. I also went through a breakup that first year that made my year all the worse. However, I made sure to develop good relationships with my professors in the meantime. I kept up my grades, and with the help of my profs’ recommendations, I was able to transfer to an elite university, where I had a “happily ever after” college experience over the next three years.

However, not everything panned out according to the timeline I wanted for my life. I wanted to attend medical school right after college, but I didn’t get in. So I ended up teaching a couple of years first. The day I left for YCS Seattle, I learned that I had gotten into medical school. It took a lot of failure before I finally got what I was after, but I didn’t let the failures drown out my desires. Lots of people around the world apply several times for medical school, and many eventually quit. The rejection letters may become too much for them to bear emotionally, or they get tired of waiting, or they lose focus, or they think it will never happen. Readers, if you want something, keep fighting for it. Don’t interpret rejection as a sign that you are not worthy. Maybe you aren’t worthy just yet, so become worthy.

That’s the approach I essentially took to the Deck Doctor Contest. I could have looked at all the entries and gone, “Holy crap, 60+ entrants, there’s no way they’ll pick me out of all these people.” I could have let that paralyze me from even trying. Instead, I thought, “This is a job application. It’s not just any job application, but it is a chance to turn the game I love INTO a job.” That thought excited me, so I decided to spend a night pouring 7,000 words into a document that became my first entry. As I advanced to later rounds, I kept writing every article with the constant thought that I wasn’t writing some casual forum post; I was writing my job application to AlterRealityGames. I was determined to show ARG that I not only knew what I was talking about, but that I was good at describing what I knew in my head. That’s what drove me to produce the quality work you’ve seen.

I tell you these things about myself not to toot my own horn. My story is not the story of the achiever – quite the opposite, in fact. I had to fail a whole lot to get what I’ve wanted in life, and most of the major victories I’ve fought for came later than I had anticipated. My story was the same in Yugioh. For the first several months I played the game, I couldn’t top a local, not even the less competitive ones. People around me went through the same experience, and some of them quit tournaments or Yugioh altogether. I think that’s a very poor mindset, to stop competing because you aren’t doing well. There’s almost no hobby I find as wasteful as casual gaming (wherever there exists a competitive alternative for that game).

So where am I now in this game? I have the funds for anything I want due to local wins, but I have no YCS top. Sometimes I wonder how some of my friends topped in one try whereas I have not topped after several. I confess that this reality has tempted me into giving up on the YCS tour. But I haven’t given up because I know what kind of difference the persevering attitude makes. That’s how legends like Joe Giorlando are made. The climb to the top was a long grind for him. But it’s worth the effort. So very worth it.

Jeff Jones and the Nimble Frogs

Speaking of legends, Jeff’s here as arbiter for the final round of Deck Doctor. In Jeff’s article, “The Golden Touch,” he mentions Bubble Bringer as a card he considers under the radar, one of those singles worth keeping because of the potential they carry down the road. He’s included the full playset in today’s water-bending deck. Jeff is already an established water-bender of the Mermail-Atlantean variety, but this time the patient he’s brought to the table consists of Frogs and Nimble monsters.

Main Deck: 40

Monsters: 29
3 Maxx “C”
3 Effect Veiler
3 Light and Darkness Dragon
3 Moulinglacia the Elemental Lord
3 Nimble Sunfish
3 Nimble Manta
3 Nimble Angler
3 Swap Frog
3 Dupe Frog
2 Ronintoadin

Spells: 8
3 Moray of Greed
1 Dark Hole
1 Heavy Storm
1 Monster Reborn
1 Foolish Burial
1 Pot of Avarice

Traps: 3
3 Bubble Bringer

Extra Deck: 15
1 Armory Arm
1 Ally of Justice Catastor
1 T.G. Hyper Librarian
1 Black Rose Dragon
1 Gungnir, Dragon of the Ice Barrier
3 Number 96: Dark Mist
3 Gachi Gachi Gantetsu
2 Daigusto Phoenix
1 Shining Elf
1 Hieratic Sun Dragon Overlord of Heliopolis

A Frog deck with NINE rank 2’s and no Obelisk?

I’ll go ahead and say it. I detest most frog decks. They stall like no tomorrow and are a reason why this game needs to have 45-50 minute time limits. In the past several tournament matches I’ve had against frog players, only one pulled off the second win to take the match against me. Still, the matches are incredibly frustrating because they take me all the way to time fairly often. In fact, no deck takes me to time as frequently as frog does.

With that said, Nimble Frogs isn’t quite as annoying because it doesn’t play Battle Fader. This makes for fewer instances of going into time. The deck is quite neat, actually, and rather different from the usual frog engine. I’ll explain what Nimble Frogs do in general, as well as highlight some of its weaknesses.

The deck itself couldn’t really exist before Abyss Rising, because so much of the strategy hinges on Nimble Angler. Angler’s effect summons up to two other Nimble monsters from the deck, but what makes it good is its trigger is so generic: being sent from the hand OR deck to the grave. What a beauty to behold. The trigger condition doesn’t say “by an effect” which means it doesn’t matter whether it’s sent to pay Swap Frog/Undine’s cost or sent via Swap Frog/Foolish Burial’s effect; it will still work. Since it’s either hand or deck, you have all kinds of ways to trigger it. And the best part? It’s an “If” effect, meaning it can’t miss its timing, even when an effect takes place between the time its trigger condition is met and when the effect itself forms a chain link.

So let’s say you discard Angler for Swap Frog’s effect. Swap Frog summons itself, and since Angler is an “If” effect, the summon of Swap Frog does not cause Angler to miss timing. After the summon, Angler is activated as chain link 1. Swap Frog’s summon triggers its own effect, so Swap Frog’s effect stacks on top as chain link 2. The reason the chain stacks in this order is because Angler is triggered first, and Swap Frog second. If Solemn Warning is used to negate Swap’s summon, you still get Angler’s effect, allowing you to make that rank 2 with very little fear of another Solemn Warning. If the opponent waits with Solemn Warning, he can’t use it on Angler’s effect in this scenario since it is “hidden” behind chain link 2, Swap Frog’s effect. He can use the Warning on the rank 2 that you make afterward, but that’s still good for you since you’ve traded a card in your hand for your opponent’s Warning and 2000 LP, AND you haven’t used your normal summon yet.

Nimble Angler is a gateway to many plays, offering instant tribute fodder without using your normal summon in the same way that other frog decks do, but also offering an XYZ alternative in a way that other frogs don’t do nearly as well. Nimble Sunfish synergizes well with Angler, offering advantages akin to what I described about Emmersblade two articles ago. You can sit on Sunfish passively or collide with it during your own battle phase. When you suicide with Sunfish and dump Angler, it summons another Sunfish first, then Angler activates and resolves in a separate chain. The Sunfish you bring out can then collide again, rinse and repeat. One Sunfish is thus quite threatening, as it can allow you to enter main phase 2 with a slew of plays involving rank 2s, powerful tribute monsters, or even synchro summoning.

In fact, the last option has not gone unnoticed in the community. My friend Matt (a lot of you know him as Dennis Frogman), as well as many other players, swears by Quickdraw Synchron in this deck. Quickdraw provides more discard fodder for Angler and enables more synchro plays without using up the normal summon. The downside, however, is that you have to use those mediocre Yusei synchros. With the exception of Drill Warrior, they are not that attractive to me as a deck builder.

The tribute monsters one often associates with frog decks are Monarchs, Light and Darkness Dragon (LADD), and Obelisk the Tormentor. Since this deck has a greater tendency toward XYZ plays, you will not see quite as many tribute monsters as you would in a deck like Frognarch, hence no Obelisk. I consider Obelisk a liability in any case, as it will clog your hand if you are going for the XYZ play, and already makes hands involving Moray of Greed, Bubble Bringer, additional Obelisk, and hand traps even more inconsistent. Obelisk isn’t invincible, in any case, as evidenced in Simon’s phenomenal top 16 match at Providence:

http://www.konami.com/yugioh/blog/?p=11448

Most commonly, the tribute monsters you will see run here are LADD, and the less common Raiza the Storm Monarch. Raiza seems an odd pick over Caius, though the primary reason it is fit for this deck is because Daigusto Phoenix enables OTK plays with it. LADD is great in that it possesses most of the advantages of Obelisk (not losing to the majority of traps and spells) while being more dependable for summoning.

Loading up the grave on turn 1 is easily done, which is why the deck is likely to run cards like Avarice, Bubble Bringer, Salvage, and Moulinglacia. Exodius even has some popularity in the deck, though that card is too gimmicky and unfit for truly competitive builds.

Lemuria, the Forgotten City is a core combo piece that this deck often is built around, as its effect to raise your monsters’ levels enables higher ranked XYZ plays. Rank 5 and rank 6 monsters confer all sorts of advantage, such as Zenmaioh/Adreus’ ability to destroy or even Exa-Beetle’s synergy with sending Nimble Manta to the grave to both get rid of a problem card while swarming. As icing on the cake, after using the effect of Zenmaioh, Adreus, or Beetle, you can overlay into the WIND attribute Gaia Dragon, the Thunder Charger, attacking twice with the aid of Daigusto Phoenix’ ignition effect.

These are just a few of many forms in which this deck is seeing play. The deck, while not tier 1, has significant enough power that it needs to be on a player’s radar. Frogs has always been one of those matchups that a player ought to know how to play against just because its strategy is so different, and this new rendition of the deck belongs on that list as well. If you aren’t familiar with the deck, the opponent can easily capitalize on your mistakes, as the mistimed use of trap cards like Solemn Warning can prove fatal.

The deck has more than its fair share of weaknesses. Macro Cosmos and Dimensional Fissure pretty much say, “While this card is face up on the field, you can’t win.” Maxx “C” can be problematic as well, since leaving a special summon play unfinished gives you a very vulnerable field. Considering that you don’t run backrow protection, this weakness is compounded. It’s not like Wind-Ups, where you can leave out Rabbit and stop after the opponent draws a card, ready to continue play next turn. The maindecked monsters are tiny fish on their own, and stopping due to Maxx “C” is very detrimental. Jurrac Guaiba is a pretty big threat against the main deck, punishing any lingering monsters (be careful with your Treeborn Frog – you might not want to bring it back in the standby phase). Defensive stalling is an issue as well. Without the right tools, a card like Spirit Reaper or Zenmaines in defense can result in your deckout if you get careless.

Monsters

Monsters: 29
3 Maxx “C”
3 Effect Veiler
3 Light and Darkness Dragon
3 Moulinglacia the Elemental Lord
3 Nimble Sunfish
3 Nimble Manta
3 Nimble Angler
3 Swap Frog
3 Dupe Frog
2 Ronintoadin

The full suite of hand traps is the first thing to cut. You have to ask yourself what you are really trying to hit with those cards, and then consider whether it’s worth the many other cards you could be drawing in their place. Particularly, I have Moray of Greed synergy in mind. Drawing the non-waters like LADD or Raiza with Moray is already going to hurt, drawing hand traps in addition will make Moray that much harder to play.

Another purpose in the deletion of hand traps (or at least, their movement from the main to the side) is that there needs to be room for Genex Undine (and Genex Controller). The card is an absolute staple here because of its synergy with Nimble Angler and for just being a water monster to begin with.

The boss monsters I’ll be weighing are LADD, Moulinglacia, and Raiza. Anything else is excessive and diverges from the game plan, and again, with Moray in mind, the deck cannot be overburdened with non-water cards. I’m not excited about the prospect of multiple LADDs or multiple Glaces when you can’t make them live. Granted, they often will be, but Raiza has more playable hands. You aren’t guaranteed to open Swap Frog-Angler every time; sometimes that one tribute is all you can afford. Instead of 2 playsets of boss monsters, I’m going with 3 pairs of boss monsters for the versatility (the term “boss” used loosely for Raiza).

The 9 Nimble cards stay, as they form the central theme of swarming with level 2s. They’re the deck’s form of currency, and you have to be careful not to spend it right away. A hand like Swap Frog-Angler can get you through all your Nimble monsters in one go, but that doesn’t mean it should. Until you see the Avarice, budget the Nimble monsters wisely, and don’t overextend with your play when you aren’t securing the game.

Swap Frog is your best discard outlet, giving you the option of either normal or special summon. It remains untouched at three. Ronintoadin is one of those cards that needs to get limited, as its effect is rather ludicrous (and it also restricts future card design on frogs). Still, I wouldn’t go with more than three here as you only need to run enough to win, and not so many that you draw badly. You aren’t going to need to summon it three times in one play. In a lot of situations, you can detach it from Daigusto Phoenix and special summon it again in the same main phase if you need more resources on the board. Instead of maxing out on the third copy, you can just do plays like that, and you’ll be covered. Dupe Frog is as much effect dump fodder as he is a wall. He doesn’t serve in any capacity beyond that, and really is not necessary at three copies.

Jeff has comically left out Treeborn Frog, which clearly needs to take the third Dupe Frog’s place. It’s superior to Dupe as dump fodder and provides recursive fuel for tribute summons and Enemy Controller, should you run it. Treeborn goes in at one.

As mentioned earlier, I’m saying no the Quickdraw engine because the Synchrons outside of Drill Warrior are not worth the card commitment. In addition, the water monster count is at 21 at this point. Jeff started at 20, and I don’t want to go any lower than that for Moray/Moulinglacia purposes. Quickdraw and Tuning will only make that concept more convoluted.

Edits:
-3 Max “C”
-3 Effect Veiler
-1 LADD
-1 Moulinglacia
-1 Dupe Frog
+3 Genex Undine
+2 Genex Controller
+2 Raiza
+1 Treeborn Frog

Spells

Spells: 8
3 Moray of Greed
1 Dark Hole
1 Heavy Storm
1 Monster Reborn
1 Foolish Burial
1 Pot of Avarice

While Moray of Greed speeds up the deck, the card has the same vulnerability that Gladiator Beast’s Respite did back in the GB days: it’s a potentially dead topdeck, it’s essentially a combo card (as it requires other things to work), and you’ll be tempted to use it to return a monster in your hand back to your deck when you actually need that monster. For these reasons, I never maxed out on Respite when I ran Glads, and I would follow the same principle here as well. While 21 water monsters in Nimble Frogs is certainly more than the 16 or so viable targets you had for Respite in GBs, I still feel iffy about running 3 of the SAME card that you don’t want to draw as a top deck. Two should suffice.

Dark Hole destroys all monsters on the field; that hasn’t changed in the decade it’s existed. Of course it stays. Gachi can especially bait the opponent into overcommitting to the monster zones, allowing you to Dark Hole for more value. Heavy Storm is your quickest maindecked out to Macro Cosmos, while Raiza answers the card to a lesser extent. Monster Reborn has some broken effect that I don’t remember at the moment, but I’m pretty sure it’s worth leaving in here.

Foolish Burial is a spell I would drop just because I would side it out so often (in anticipation of their graveyard disruption side). Bear in mind that we inserted 3 Genex Undine, more than enough discard engine to compensate. Burial creates a first turn Gachi with Angler, but then again, Swap Frog and Genex Undine do the same, plus they synergize with Moray, plus we run six copies. Six cards that, drawn by themselves, make first turn Gachi - not bad.

Pot of Avarice stays. As mentioned earlier, you can load your grave for it turn one if you so choose. Also, the budget of 9 Nimble monsters can be exhausted quickly, so you’ll want that recursion.

The last spells I would add are an Enemy Controller and a Creature Swap. Simon He has this clever trick of running one-ofs of spells like these. The advantage of one copy is that your opponent will be pressured into playing around the card after seeing it, not knowing that you only run one. The advantage of multiple one-ofs is that even if your opponent knows you only run one, you have answers to a more diverse array of situations. This leaves your opponent struggling to figure out which one-of to even play around.

An additional advantage of these cards is they provide more answers when you’re trying to draw your way out of that turn one Macro Cosmos or even defensive monsters. Banking on drawing that one Heavy isn’t enough, so why not ignore the opponent’s Macro setup by just taking his field presence with Creature Swap? Also, if your opponent gets clever enough to recognize your general lack of monster removal and tries to sit on something in defense (especially to avoid Dark Mist from running over it), E-Con followed by a tribute summon or Creature Swap will be just the answer. Lastly, I really like all the tricks E-Con can pull off, like allowing your monster effects to resolve through Veiler.

While there is plenty of room in the Extra for rank 5 and rank 6 monsters to bring out by way of Lemuria, there is no room for Lemuria itself. I mean this not just in the sense of card slots, but also in the sense of win condition. There is enough going on with the existing engine that there is no room for an additional win condition in the form of XYZ plays involving Lemuria. The card doesn’t actually pay for itself; your opponent has to have the right board and you have to have the right pieces to combo out any real advantage with the field spell. As I’ve maintained throughout our fix, I’m aiming to maximize the consistency of the Moray-water engine. The fish give us rank 2s, tribute fodder, and occasionally synchros. Additional win conditions will only distort the path to victory.

Edits:
-1 Moray of Greed
-1 Foolish Burial
+1 Enemy Controller
+1 Creature Swap

Traps

Traps: 3
3 Bubble Bringer

Bubble Bringer is the hot piece that began this entire discussion, and I’ll end with a closer examination of the card. When Frognarch was more relevant, I respected the players who wisely chose to not run the lone Treacherous Trap Hole in their lineup. The reason was because one of the deck’s advantages was that it capitalized on the opponent’s MST/Heavy Storm as dead draws. Should you set Treacherous, you open yourself to the possibility of an end phase MST, turning what should have been a virtual neg 1 in card advantage for your opponent into an even exchange.

For this reason I felt ambivalent toward Bubble Bringer in this deck. On the one hand, Bringer is an instant XYZ. On the other, it flat out loses to MST and stops you from capitalizing on the Frognarch-no backrow principle. Even worse is that Bringer isn’t a true chainable. Yes, it can be chained to MST in a literal sense. However, its effect to special summon cannot be used in the same chain that activates the card, flipping it from face down to face up. That’s how it is ruled in the OCG, at least.

A tactic to employ: while you can’t make the opponent’s MST dead altogether, you can bait him into using it incorrectly. Until he knows what you’re playing, he cannot know for sure that he’s supposed to MST your facedown on his own turn to avoid Bubble’s special summon effect. If you flip the Bubble Bringer in his end phase, it is unlikely that he has kept the MST in hand. When your turn begins, you can activate BB at any time you can activate most non-damage step spell speed 2 effects. Your opponent likely won’t know what the card does the first time he plays you. If you see him pick it up to read it, then there’s a good chance he won’t recognize that its effect is spell speed 2. So wait for the MST if you have a good read on his ignorance, then chain BB’s effect to MST. He’ll of course challenge whether or not you can do that. After the ruling dispute is resolved, special summon your targets, and enjoy the card advantage. If your opponent is silly and thinks he should chain MST to BB’s effect instead (basically the reverse of the previous scenario), point out that sending BB to the grave is a cost, so MST will not be able to target it as chain link 2.

As a quick summary: Bubble Bringer loses to MST 100% of the time if your opponent blind spaces on his turn (or spaces it while it’s face up). Bubble Bringer never loses to MST if your opponent sets the MST and you flip Bubble Bringer on his end phase. Bubble Bringer loses to MST if you flip it face-up on your turn (and MST chains to the activation).

I really really like E-Con, so much so that I want to run 2, but I think the 40th slot needs to be spent on Raigeki Break. There are three main reasons. It lets you dump Controller so that Avarice makes Undine live in the future. It gives you advantage if your opponent wisens up and decides to start blind spacing your backrow, thinking that every set must be Bubble Bringer. It’s an additional out to Macro Cosmos, Dolkka, Reaper, defense position walls, etc. It does a lot of things, and I think it’s a great one-of.

Edits:
+1 Raigeki Break

Extra Deck

Extra Deck: 15
1 Armory Arm
1 Ally of Justice Catastor
1 T.G. Hyper Librarian
1 Black Rose Dragon
1 Gungnir, Dragon of the Ice Barrier
3 Number 96: Dark Mist
3 Gachi Gachi Gantetsu
2 Daigusto Phoenix
1 Shining Elf
1 Hieratic Sun Dragon Overlord of Heliopolis

Genex Controller is the sole tuner in the maindeck. With everything else being level 2, it follows that only odd-leveled synchro monsters stay in. While you can conceivably sync for level 4 (Controller + Treeborn) or a level 6 (Controller + Undine), these scenarios are rare. In place of the vanilla synchro Gaia that I would play if I synced with Controller and Undine, I’m including the more versatile Number 17: Leviathan Dragon, as there are more ways to make it (Controller+Controller and Undine+Undine), and its effect can be used to boost its attack over Gorz and the like.

Shining Elf is rank 2, but that alone is not reason enough for it to see play in this deck. The 100 attack it has over Daigusto Phoenix is its strongest advantage over the bird, not its effect. The inclusion of Undine and Controller means more potential for rank 3s, and Bubble Bringer even lets you rank 3 with a single card. I’m not going to free up 5+ slots for every good rank 3 just because of these possibilities, but I will make room for at least Zenmaines and Temtempo (because Zenmaines poses problems for this deck). Two level 8s on board is plausible, so Heliopolis stays. I am not including Acid Golem this time around, but it’s worth your consideration, as it can take care of monsters Dark Mist cannot, especially under Skill Drain.

Edits:
-1 Armory Arm
-1 Number 96: Dark Mist
-1 Shining Elf
+1 Number 17: Leviathan Dragon
+1 Wind-Up Zenmaines
+1 Temtempo the Percussion Djinn

The Finished Product

In total, 13 cards were removed and 13 cards were added to the deck.

Main Deck: 41

Monsters: 28
3 Nimble Manta
3 Nimble Angler
3 Nimble Sunfish
3 Genex Undine
3 Swap Frog
2 Dupe Frog
2 Ronintoadin
2 Genex Controller
2 Raiza the Storm Monarch
2 Moulinglacia, the Elemental Lord
2 Light and Darkness Dragon
1 Treeborn Frog

Spells: 8
2 Moray of Greed
1 Dark Hole
1 Heavy Storm
1 Monster Reborn
1 Pot of Avarice
1 Enemy Controller
1 Creature Swap

Traps: 4
3 Bubble Bringer
1 Raigeki Break

Extra Deck: 15
1 Ally of Justice Catastor
1 T.G. Hyper Librarian
1 Black Rose Dragon
1 Gungnir, Dragon of the Ice Barrier
3 Gachi Gachi Gantetsu
2 Number 96: Dark Mist
2 Daigusto Phoenix
1 Wind-Up Zenmaines
1 Temtempo the Percussion Djinn
1 Number 17: Leviathan Dragon
1 Hieratic Sun Dragon Overlord of Heliopolis

Final Thoughts

There’s been enough hype surrounding Lemuria that it deserves mention. While I don’t consider it a competitive card, it can be toyed around with, and there’s no deck more suited for the field spell than Nimble Frogs.

I would side 2 Maxx “C” and 2 Veiler because an effectively trapless deck needs hand traps as a lifeline. To supplement Maxx “C” I would even side Tragoedia (and possibly Gorz). I think Tragoedia’s level manipulation makes it better suited for this deck’s main engine, but Gorz is noteworthy as well because I like when LADD can choose a strong beater with its destruction effect. This will cause your opponent to think twice about using Solemn Warning.

As Frognarch decks generally do, so can this deck side a variety of tribute monsters with dedicated effects. Classic options for Frognarch were Dark Dust Spirit and Mobius. Those two aren’t as good right now, but siding Vanity’s Fiend for Chaos Dragon and other trapless decks, Jinzo for Macro Cosmos and backrow heavy decks and burn, or End of Anubis for Mermatlantean are good options. Each of these three cards can seal off strategies and ensure that your win condition out paces your opponent’s.

Skill Drain and Gozen Match are viable in the side, though if you use either, main the Acid Golem. To cover the graveyard hate that will inevitably be sided against you, I would let Jinzo take care of traps and use MST on everything else.

With that, I’d like to just say bye for now. If it is my last article, then I thank you for taking the time to read my work. If it isn’t, then stay tuned for the next episode. Thanks to all the local players from Heroes and Strike who voiced their support for me. Every now and then some of you would stop and ask me how the contest was going, what I was going to write about next, etc. Those small things were appreciated.

Remember what I said at the start – don’t tilt. You’re going to fail at things in life, that’s the reality. But you have to push on as and fight for your goals as if nothing can stop you. Until next time,

Play hard or go home.

Sincerely,

Johnny

Johnny Li

Johnny Li

Houston, TX
Johnny Li

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